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OTP WASHINGTON: The Capitol Riots

Hosted by Nadine Bourne, with reporters and panelists Samantha Jill Anderson, Jessica Nix, Timi Awoyinka, and Ivy Lyons.

Nadine Bourne 0:26
Just under 90 days have passed since this moment.

Sen. Lankford 0:31
My challenge today is not about the good people of Arizona.

Sen. Grassley 0:37
The Senate will stand in recess until the call of the chair

Sen. Lankford 0:42
We’ll pause. Thank you

Nadine Bourne 0:46
But what exactly happened my day has been locked into the minds of Americans and and won’t go away anytime soon for those on the ground in DC. Our own Samantha Jill Anderson has more on this front. Take a look.

Samantha Jill Anderson 1:03
Razor wired fences, National Guards troops and major road closures. These are the realities outside of the Capitol in response to the insurrection on January 6, and weeks later, the Capitol grounds are a far cry from their one’s open grass yards, paths and streets. grounds that many local Capitol Hill residents say they view as their backyard. Even tourists are adapting to the change.

Tourist 1:30
I think this is kind of sad, because I mean, I wouldn’t hear from at least this disease and it’s close. It’s pretty sad for me. Yeah.

Samantha Jill Anderson 1:39
The Capitol buildings grounds are traditionally watched over by security Capitol Police officers and protected by some barriers. However, these measures fail to prevent the storming of the Capitol in January by some supporters of former President Trump in an immediate response and to protect the capital from future attacks. eight foot tall fencing stretching some three miles was implemented, and about 26,000 National Guard troops were deployed to DC, costing taxpayers nearly $500 million. While the Capitol building has been the primary focus of protection, the US Botanical Gardens Supreme Court, Library of Congress and Senate and House office buildings are all blocked off by the barriers, while a definite deadline for the removal of the fencing surrounding the Capitol and a return to normal has yet to be announced. The US Capitol Police and other law enforcement agencies say they continue to track threats against lawmakers and that more weeks of National Guard protection and additional months of fencing may be needed. Now the idea of permanent fencing around the Capitol has been rejected by both local community members and city leaders who say the Capitol ground should be both safe and accessible for OTP news in Washington. I’m Samantha Jill Anderson.

Nadine Bourne 3:02
Thank you, Samantha. And as the nation learns more about the events surrounding the January 6 insurrection, many wonder what the local ramifications will be going forward. Joining me now is six district adversary neighborhood commission chair Edward Daniels. Hi, Daniel. How are you?

Edward Daniels 3:21
I’m good Nadine. How are you? Thanks for having me.

Nadine Bourne 3:24
No problem. Thank you for coming.

Edward Daniels 3:27
Of course, of course.

Nadine Bourne 3:28
So just to dive on in with everything. I really want to know what was the like in DC neighborhoods and communities before the Capitol Riot?

Edward Daniels 3:40
Yeah, it was a very surreal, disturbing time. I represent residents here of Capitol Capitol Riverfront Navy Yard. So we’re just a few blocks over from the Capitol itself. And my living room window actually faces one of the hotels where lots of the protesters were staying. It was very odd, because there was a different tone in town leading up to that day leading up to the inauguration. Lots of people coming into town with lots of, you know, Trump flags, American flags, Confederate flags, and it was just a little odd to see that many people start to diverge upon the city. And no one knew what was gonna happen. No one knew what was happening, you know, leading up into that to that day, we knew that protests would happen, but we didn’t know, I guess the severity of what would happen that evening and I watched it all unfold on television and also from my living room window as they all gathered outside and left the hotel to head down to the Capitol.

Nadine Bourne 4:38
Did you ever think that with all of the increase of Trump supporters, Republican supporters and everything, that there would be some type of big Riot that will happen?

Edward Daniels 4:54
Um, honestly, I didn’t I don’t I don’t. I don’t I didn’t. I didn’t think that I know that there were tons of people. They were upset over the election results. And for whatever reason that was coming from, you know, the top of our leadership at the time, and I knew that, yes, there’d be angry people in town that would want to make their voices heard. And that’s understandable, we can do that. However, I wasn’t prepared for that many people coming into town and causing the trouble that they did. I’ve been in DC for 17 years. I was here in 2009, leading up to Barack Obama’s first inauguration. And I can tell you, as a DC resident, it was amazing, an amazing time to be in DC. There was nothing but love in the air leading up to that day as everyone was flocking here, and we gladly Welcome to 1 million people to that inauguration. So this time around to have this many people that were this angry over the results and whatever else to head here and to easily breach the capital. That was the part that got me I also attended many protests throughout the summer for racial injustice. And the result was not the same. Of course, the the response from police with those protesters is completely different. These people just waltz into DC from far far away and easily access the capital. And I’ve never seen anything like that before.

Nadine Bourne 6:15
How different was protection? Prior to chamber, he said, so we’ve all been seeing the different type of protests that’s been going on Black Lives Matter. Everything, how different was the protection on the capital, then to the protection that we saw on all of these footages?

Edward Daniels 6:38
From what I understand and talking with our MPD Metropolitan Police Department. In the days after the incident, it seems that there was some sort of miscommunication with what what Intel they were getting as to what might happen on January 6. I don’t think honestly, that the response from law enforcement and National Guard, or local law enforcement and Capitol Hill police, the response to these protesters was definitely a lack of preparation. And also just a very different response. I was I remember the footage of you Street, peaceful protesters, for George Floyd’s death. They had it from the street down to the National Mall on this one day. And I remember a peaceful protest line headed down there. And I was so proud to see how many people were in the streets heading down towards the the White House in the end and the Capitol, the National Guard showed up and began to release tear gas and forcefully began to assault these protesters and get them out of the area. But then on January 6, with the knowledge that there would be some sort of unrest on that day, it seemed like there was no preparation for these masses of people that headed here. So I’m still trying to trying to wrap my head around that as to why there was such different levels of enforcement on those on those days. And I mean, we watched we witnessed nationally, you know, the tear gas and all of the unrest throughout the city, I mean of helicopters, helicopters flying over protesters, peaceful protesters on the ground. And then on this day, again, it just I cannot wrap my head around the fact that these people decided to because they thought that the President actually won this election, that they were going to come to DC and stormed the Capitol. And again, they did it they did it pretty easily. And I sat and watched these people gather out front of the hotel and arm themselves when I saw these military jackets go over people as they armed themselves to head down there. I didn’t know what to expect. I thought okay, well, surely the police are going to be at the hotel soon or on the street soon. No, that didn’t happen. They easily left their hotels geared up, went to the Capitol and basically, you know, walked in without knocking. So I’m still to this day, just a little baffled as to how easily that take that that happened.

Nadine Bourne 8:55
Now speaking of former President Trump saying go to the Capitol, and Brian, and everything, there has been a lot of talk on who is really responsible for the events that happened on January 6, and I want to ask you your opinion on Who do you think is most responsible for the events that unfolded?

Edward Daniels 9:19
Yeah, I think, again, the the the call to arms came from, you know, the top so I think that his speech moments before they all decided to storm the Capitol. Definitely played a part in it. But there was also it seems organization well before that, that on January 6, something would happen. I’m not sure if he was aware of just how many people would be coming here. And you know if they had a plan to actually do that or not, but we’ve since learned that there were pipe bombs planted at the republican national headquarters in a republican headquarters here in DC and democratic headquarters in DC. So yeah, this was well planned and I think that from the top him in his rhetoric and his vitriol and saying You know, we’re not happy. Let’s go to the Capitol and make it known that we’re not happy. Yeah, you, you, you basically incited that I don’t see how there’s any debate, you know that your words cause this action. So yeah, I think that he’s definitely responsible in any of the enablers that help plan these trips to DC people didn’t just you know, drive their cars into DC these are busloads of people. That right came into the city that flew into the city. And again, I know my city very well. I’ve been here through many events, many inaugurations many large, large events, were prepared for that DC is very prepared for these big events. You don’t just walk into the city and walk into the, you know, the Capitol, US Capitol, on that day these people did.

Nadine Bourne 10:43
And during the riots and following days afterwards, how has neighboring communities supported each other during this time of chaos? To say the least?

Edward Daniels 11:00
Yeah, I think it’s so I’m so glad to be a community leader. And I can honestly tell you that I know, thanks to former President Trump. That’s why I stepped into this into this role and decided to run for commissioner of my neighborhood, because I felt like I couldn’t sit around and point fingers, I had to get out and do something. I’ve seen a lot of my neighbors that have really stepped up and comforted one another asked you know each other, hey, what do you need? I think a lot of people realize that this isn’t, this isn’t who we are, there’s a very loud minority of people, these indirect insurrectionists, these white nationalist, these people that don’t want to be part of a conversation, they want to cause pain, they want to cause violence, they don’t want to use rational and logical conversation to understand one another. So I think that we all understand that that’s a loud minority that unfortunately, are still out there. And are there’s still, you know, looking to incite violence, I do believe. But I think that my neighbors have been great in taking care of one another touching base with with one another. There have been lots of community conversations. And I think that moving from the year of 2020, from the insane here with the pandemic racial injustice, we have a lot of discussions to take place. And I think that that’s where we are now is understanding needing to understand one another with with conversation. And I think that most of my neighbors are understanding that, that we have to continue conversations and understanding what each of us needs.

Nadine Bourne 12:27
Okay. And during the time of, you know, pandemic, we’re in COVID-19. Do you think that people were concerned that this could have been another big spreader for COVID-19?

Edward Daniels 12:47
Most definitely, I think so. Um, as I mentioned, right, I guess I should mention, I’m also working with the DC Department of Health as a contact Tracy. So I have been doing that for six months, as well as, you know, serving my community. And I think that any large gathering, I think those of us behind the scenes, any large gathering, we’re constantly worried that that gathering will become a super spreader event. We did see numbers tick up after the after the insurrection that day and just all of the activity in town. So yeah, we’re always concerned about that. We are working hard, you know, as community leaders, the DC health department to put an end to this to the virus and get back to our normal lives. So I think that Yeah, they there’s always a worry when they’re large gatherings of any sort that we’re going to you know, cause a another spike in the COVID cases.

Nadine Bourne 13:39
When we return, the panel will discuss some of the long term effects of the January six riots on education in the district.

Nadine Bourne 13:51
We are back now with Americans working hard to determine where our country is heading, next, we’re questioning what our next steps are as students and residents of the district. Jessica Nix is a student journalist and moderator for GWTVs Capital Crossfire. She has completed and continue working on internships with CBS News in Washington. Timi Awoyinka is my co host of over drinks my name to me. She’s an OTP Washington correspondent and has continued producing excellent journalism. And Ivy Lyons is the host of The Political Tic Tok, our own OTP Washington political correspondent and this show’s executive producer. They have worked with several politicians, Washington’s ABC affiliate, and with NBC’s Washington bureau. So let’s get right into it. In the wake of the capital riots and previous protests, are students prepared for the world around them to become more stressful than what it already is?

Timi Awoyinka 15:00
I mean, I don’t, I don’t think students are prepared for anything at all. Everything is just taken us all by surprise. I mean, no one thought something like this could ever happen. And I don’t think anyone in particular is prepared for the next steps or what you know, it’s going to look like in the days to come.

Jessica Nix 15:25
See, I think students are prepared, I think that they’ve learned how to adapt, I think they’ve learned how to look work virtually. So I think moving forward out of the workplace, into the workplace and out of college, that they can take these skills that they’ve learned from this terrible time that we’ve been in for this past year, and really apply that to the workplace, they know how to adapt. And yeah, every day is different. And something new is always going to come up, you never know what’s going to happen, but they know to take everything in stride. And that they know that they can get through it. And then they can create it since this is a journalism talk, they can create excellent journalism, or they can create whatever they want to be able to create as long as they know how to adapt.

Nadine Bourne 16:01
So Jessica, because you are student, student journalists, and you say that you are prepared. Being in the field that you do have to go up to people you do have to be a bit more interactive. Do you honestly feel like you are getting the best education you can, during COVID-19? to become a professional journalist in the near future?

Jessica Nix 16:28
I think that’s a great question. I think it’s incredibly difficult. To be virtual to learn virtually burnout is real, I feel it, my friends feel it. Everyone I work with feels it of having to be on a screen 24 seven. journalism is a very screen oriented industry, you’re constantly on your phone, you’re constantly on your email, you’re constantly editing and looking at documents. So your eyes are constantly strained as well. So maybe I’m training for that. I guess, maybe that’s what I’m learning. But I will say that it’s definitely it’s definitely been a challenge. I do think for my school, I think for working virtually and turning virtually, working with gdb. TV virtually, it’s given me a different set of skills that I otherwise would not have had without the pandemic. But it’s it’s definitely difficult, it’s hard, you aren’t learning the same things being out in the field, which I really wish you know, of course, we didn’t have this and I could be out in the fields learning all of this. But I’m for what it is and for what we have to live through. I believe I am getting a great education and learning how to adapt, and learning how to be resilient, and learning how to push forward and to still hold people’s feet to the fire and bring the truth to light. And that’s what we should be doing as journalists, whether you’re virtual or if you’re in person. That’s That’s our job. And that’s what you should be doing.

Nadine Bourne 17:48
Um, Georgetown University, and also Jessica from GW, both schools are in the heart of DC. With everything dealing with politics and protests going on. Do you guys think that your institutions and colleges and universities across the country are being transparent with their students with everything going on in the news,

Jessica Nix 18:15
I think transparency is hard. And the era of COVID gw has been online for a year now. So we haven’t had many students on campus, I think we just welcome back up to 1500 students on campus, we haven’t had a single in person class. We’ve been completely virtual this whole time. And I think it’s hard because a lot of times, college administration has been making a lot of empty promises. And you can’t really make any promises and COVID. And so it’s been a lot of We will be back and then a few days later saying we will not be back. And I think it’s incredibly difficult to be an administration official, it’s incredibly difficult to be in any job right now. Because there’s you just have no idea what’s going to happen next. But I do think administration officials should be a little bit more transparent and saying, we do not know what’s going to happen. So we cannot make a promise as to whether or not we will be in person or whether or not we’re going to be virtual. And I think that’s that’s what college colleges should really do to be able to increase their transparency.

Ivy Lyons 19:16
So I would say that and right. Building on top of it is all of the you know, student journalism is full of great reporting, the GW Hatchett. The Hoya, The Voice. There are so many like local news outlets, including those that are in American University and at UMD that are covering what’s going on at their institution as well as trying to keep a bead on what’s going on in their local area. And one of the things that has come out or stood out to me most is that no matter what’s happening politically in those spaces, it’s the allocation of resources that’s gonna, you know, get you at the end of the day, if you can’t promise if you if you make a promise and you don’t have the resources to allocate for it. If you don’t have the space for something, then that’s going to be the thing. That is the defining quality for your student body, you won’t have the opportunity to really dive in if you know your student journalists are finding out that you’re making all of these promises, and Moments later, your undergraduates, your grad students, your your pre collegiate athlete or your collegiate, your collegiate athletes, the people that are in that space, aren’t getting the resources that you are offering them. It becomes a comparison game for, you know, undergraduate to graduate institutions, it becomes a comparison game between individual student populations if you know yes, you know, your medical staff need to be on on deck but like how often do you need a freshman in the medical on the medical campus with no experience no ability to provide care? How often do you need someone to be on campus? As a student journalist? How often do you need someone to be on campus doing all of these jobs, it’s it’s such a broad issue of not having the resource that resources to allocate and then making promises. I think that that may be just as much an issue as making promises building on a promise is one thing, but not having the ability to even come close to fulfilling it, as Jessica said, completely different.

Nadine Bourne 21:11
And the times of these unknowns, right? And then about how we’re going to transition from Virtual Learning back to in person, how many students get to be in class at a time? do you guys feel comfortable, and you’re ready to be back in the building to be back amongst your peers again.

Jessica Nix 21:37
100% I’m dying to get back on campus. I will say, um, I think while cases are going down, hospitalizations are going down. vaccinations are going up, there are more variants coming up with COVID-19. Again, every day, something new is going to be happening. And while the stats are looking good right now, that’s no means for us to become relaxed about the pandemic, this is still a pandemic, this is still changing every single day. So while I am desperate to get back on campus, and to get some kind of normal college life back and to have a senior year, I think that you can’t really again, make any empty promises, I would hope to be back in person I would hope to be able to see my professors face to face, even if there’s a hybrid option available, just bringing students back, I think it will kind of give us a sense of normalcy again, even if we are all messed up. But I think in this year of learning and adapting for the pandemic, I think colleges have been able to figure out for the fall, how can we start bringing students back because the stats are looking better. But still keep in social distancing measures and masking up measures, and maybe updating infrastructure to make sure that freshmen dorms are having better h vac systems. And so I think that they can take these next few months before the fall semester starts to really reevaluate their systems and kind of put some stuff into place. So we don’t have these new variants spreading, and we can keep these these statistics going down. Do we think that? No, go ahead to me,

Timi Awoyinka 23:10
I was gonna say yes, definitely. I agree with all of you. I’m looking forward to, you know, going I mean, I don’t think we’re going to get back anytime soon for us as graduating seniors, but I’m ready to move back to in person learning. I think that one of the beauties of Georgetown our program is that we’re small. So they should be able to control that, you know, as long as there’s some form of vaccine available for each and every person coming back and regular testing, and I think Georgetown has been transparent about that, that they do testing for those that are on the main campus. So I think regular testing, just like Jessica said, you know, some form of hybrid to start off and then continuously, just seeing how that works out will be a good idea for transitioning back to in person classrooms.

Nadine Bourne 24:01
Do you think that the vaccine getting the vaccine will be mandatory in the coming up fall? school year? Will the administration Oh, what was that?

Jessica Nix 24:20
I was just gonna say, well, the administration cannot federally mandate a vaccine, they can encourage us to get vaccinated. They can’t federally mandate mask wearing except Biden did do that on federal grounds, which is allowed, but um, so they can just encourage it. So I think, you know, universities require certain vaccinations when you enroll in the school when you move on to campus. So it’ll be interesting to see if universities start requiring it. I believe they should. Just because we are seeing statistics that it does stop the spread. It does help with decreasing hospitalizations and if it really does keep our health and you know, a college campus can be a petri dish so as long as we can keep the vaccine nations and and they can encourage that. And I think universities, universities should absolutely require it require it.

Ivy Lyons 25:08
There is a campus social political ramification that I think we would all know very well, which is, we also have that secondary like people, if they choose not to get the vaccination, be it for religious reasons for health reasons, whatever vaccines have, you know, like mask wearing, like the wearing of certain types of hats and paraphernalia, they have become a little bit of a political tool, a way of trying to assume a political identity, I think that that’s going to be a secondary challenge is that when we go back on campus, are we going to see, are we going to see the same Trump GOP style versus the true like the more moderate Republicans and Democrats versus more liberal individuals on campus, disgusting, vaccinations and mask wearing as if it is a serious political high key issue, when it is, in reality, just a health decision that needs to be made on that type of granular level?

Timi Awoyinka 26:14
Most definitely, I think, as I thought of that question, just like how we mentioned, other vaccines are required to resume on campus? Why should this be any different, you know, for the safety of yourself, your family members, your students, and to have a fun time in college, there should be no reason why, you know, you shouldn’t take this vaccine to start. So obviously, if you want to switch to online, and you’re not, you know, you’re not sure, that’s another option, too. But I don’t see why, you know, this thing shouldn’t be mandated in schools.

Nadine Bourne 26:50
There will be a lot of a lot of talk, a lot of arguments going on. And speaking of Trump, as we move on from the Trump tweeting era, right into a new presidency, how is student journalism going to transition? Right, so we’ve seen the era of relying on Twitter to figure out what is going on with the President. Right? How then are we now going to transition into President Biden, his stint in journalism still going to be relying on Twitter? Are we going to go back to traditional ways find a new way of doing journalism?

Timi Awoyinka 27:41
I mean, I think the social media aspects will always be there. It’s always been a powerful tool for journalists, regardless of whether Trump was there or not. But I do think we should be able to start seeing, you know, other forms being used now, I think, because charm, you know, heavily used relied on Twitter and Social Media, to, you know, break the news. I guess that was why we saw that increase, but I think it should go back to some form of regulated sense for student journalists, student journalists

Ivy Lyons 28:13
are not going to be as far behind the trail as maybe, you know, a CNN Jim Acosta type person, right, you are still going to see significant impacts to the way that journalism presents itself on social media, and especially in spaces like, especially in spaces like those of CNN, and MSNBC, but also at our local, like, level collegiate papers.

Jessica Nix 28:42
So I think in general, it’s got it’s not just a return to normalcy, it’s a return to boring and politics. And so I think student journalists are going to have an extra added pressure of how do we make senate procedure? How do we make policy an interesting story? And how can we tell that from not just looking at social media and relying on the elites in journalism and the elites in administrations and in politics, but how can we also seek that stuff out?

Nadine Bourne 29:10
Thank you so much for joining us today. Please visit OTP Washington DOT com for supporting information on our special reports. I’m Nadine Bourne, and this has been another OTP Washington special report for air on DCTV.

Transcribed by https://otter.ai

OTP NEWS WASHINGTON – Election Nights in America

EDITOR’S NOTE: While Vice President Kamala Harris is, indeed, the first female vice president, and the first woman of color, she is not the first person of color to hold the office of Vice President. That honor goes to Charles Curtis, a member of the Kaw Nation and the Vice President to President Herbert Hoover.

GOA ZHU
Welcome back from the break here on DC TV and online, my name is go azu and this is OTP news Washington special report reflecting on an election with continuing ripples through the United States and around the world. Under normal circumstances, we strive to focus on what stories look like from students in the United States. But earlier this year, journalists, young and old, began to notice that the best digests of what American discourse looks like aren’t American. They look to the voices of the BBC and those who held no allegiance to this democratic republic. Ani Kasparian discusses just one angle of a reeling international election space in her reporting. Let’s take a look.

DEMONSTRATOR
[SINGING]

ANI KASPARIAN
It’s Saturday, November 7, and I’m here in Lafayette Square in Washington DC right after the announcement of the president elect Joseph R. Biden. He will be the 46th President of the United States and the first president elect that has won against an incumbent in 25 years. His vice president elect Kamala Harris will be the first woman to serve as vice president in the United States and also the first person of color. Here in Lafayette Square people have gathered to celebrate and share with chants and signs and lots of songs and music. As you can see, there are over 1000 people gathered here today, the presidential election results came in after Pennsylvania submitted their official count, Joseph arbeiten won more than 34,000 votes more than Trump. This sealed the deal and signified that he would be the next president of the United States. Americans were on the edge of their seats during the week of the elections as day after day, a multitude of states reported the same status for their vote count to close to call down to only a few key states to determine a win. It was noted that if Biden won Pennsylvania with 20 electoral votes, he would in fact, when the entire election, once the news of this win was released, Washington DC dwellers immediately started to hear cars honking their horns and people gathering in the streets and celebration. Within a few hours. This scene we observed here in Lafayette Square ensued, I was able to speak with an American voter who participated in this celebration, when asked why she came out to do so here’s what she had to say.

DC VOTER
I’m out here because today is I feel like it’s Christmas. It’s Christmas. It’s my birthday. It’s Easter, it’s Obama all over again. I’m just excited. And I think it’s important to be here. It’s important that we all you know, get together, stick together and let the world know that we can be united again. You know, I want Trump’s supporters out here. I want everyone out here. I want people to celebrate a new day, a new day in America. You know, Democrats and Republicans, we have always had disagreements, but it’s never been this vitriol. It’s never been so is that it’s never been like this. Personally, I think I’m just looking for a change. You know, for the last four years, five years, really, we’ve had such division and such, you know, hatred In our country. And it doesn’t need to be that way. We’re Americans. We’re all Americans. And there’s no way of going backwards, but we can move forwards and we will need to move forward in a positive way.

DEMONSTRATOR

  • Mnuchin is out of the Treasury. That means Jared Kushner is out of the White House.

ANI KASPARIAN
For OTP, Washington. reporting from Lafayette Square.

GOA ZHU
And we are joined now by Priscilla Segnini. Priscilla is a current graduate student and Georgetown University’s Master’s in journalism program, and has lended her voice to the network Teletica for reporting on this election. She’s also president of Georgetown University’s chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists, one of our underwriting student organizations. Thank you so much for joining us.

PRISCILLA SEGNINI
Hi, Goa. How are you?

GOA ZHU
I’m good. How are you?

PRISCILLA SEGNINI
I’m doing well.

GOA ZHU
So can you tell us a little bit about the reporting that you sent back to electrica and some of the concerns that people had at the time?

PRISCILLA SEGNINI
Yes, so This new station, you’re very interesting to cover the elections, especially because there are a lot of like Costa Ricans who are living in the United States that are voting, or were were able to vote in the presidential elections. So Costa Rica has a strong relationship to the United States, we have a lot of tourists coming from the United States, a lot of people that go down there to retire. And in addition to that, Costa Rica has a lot of share services offices that they offer to the United States. So companies like brothers, IBM, Intel, and HP are based down there. So for the country’s very relevant what is going to happen in the upcoming elections. So they really want us to cover how Costa Ricans were voting, who they were supporting what issues they care about in this upcoming elections.

GOA ZHU
And so were people in Costa Rica generally surprised on the result of this election?

PRISCILLA SEGNINI
I think a lot of people were supporting Trump a lot of people who are supported by them. But a lot of people were hoping that Biden was going was going to get elected because of a lot of immigration policies and implemented during his administration. There were a lot of like issues with people that were having, for example, when you apply for the work for the tourist visa for the world visa, those spots were a little bit reducted during Trump administration. So a lot of people were hoping that things were going to go to be more smooth with Biden as a precedent. So people for sure, were kind of thinking that Trump was going maybe to have a second term. But I do think that for sure, having Biden elected was a huge surprise, surprise for the country.

GOA ZHU
So throughout your reporting, was there anything that took you by surprise, or you did not expect?

PRISCILLA SEGNINI
Yes, I think something that really took me by surprise was that I was visiting a lot of voting centers around the DC area because of reporting from there. So for example, the first one that I visited, when I was covering on Election Day was one located at Columbia Heights. And something that I was very surprised by was that they were not like a lot of people do early voting, and a lot of people voted by mail. So I was kind of like expecting that because of the COVID restrictions and all the measurements that the voting center had to put in place to make everyone to be safe when they were like voting. I was expecting some long lines, and for me was very surprising that everything was smooth. It was taking about five to 10 minutes for people to vote and nobody had to wait in a long line. So that’s something that I was very, very surprised when I was covering that day, different spots around the DC area.

GOA ZHU
Yes. Well, I’m glad that everyone’s taking social distancing very seriously. Well, thank you so much for joining us here Priscilla and for sharing your insights and reporting.

PRISCILLA SEGNINI
Thanks to you.

GOA ZHU
Now, after a prolonged election cycle, our own Samantha Jill Anderson brings us her continuing story=

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
as the new year and Inauguration Day rapidly approach. Many Americans in the world at large have been envisioning what a Biden presidency may look like. One of President Elect Biden’s campaign slogans, “Build Back Better,” offer some insight into the policy changes that many who voted blue in November are hopeful to see come to fruition. Some proposed changes include a reinvestment in American manufacturing, as well as tackling climate change. On the COVID-19. Front, improve testing and a safe reopening of schools are parts of Biden’s plans. In contrast with President Trump. Biden says he plans to ask governors to institute statewide mask mandates. Healthcare has also been prioritized. President Elect Biden supports expanding the Affordable Care Act and creating a public option. He also plans to rollback tax cuts for corporations. specific policy changes aside, according to chairman of the DC Democratic Party, Charles Wilson, a change was also at the forefront of the minds of many Biden voters.

CHARLES WILSON
I think people elected Joe will come up because they wanted respect in the White House and someone who respected the rule of law and the, you know, the ability to to peacefully protest and have a difference of opinion and not feel like You’re going to be ostracized. I guess they have the expectation that we’re going to be more civil to each other, not necessarily agree on every issue but at least respectful respectable that we can hopefully ease racial tensions. And and just, you know, there’s some sense of, like calmness, like, you know what the person in charge is God we can trust is going to do a good job and do what’s in the best interests of the American people.

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
President Elect Biden may face challenges putting his policy plans into place, should the republicans maintain their majority in the Senate. The Georgia runoff election in January will determine whether Republicans or Democrats have Senate control. Now while popular amongst many voters, Biden’s policies are not without criticism, over 73 million Americans voted for President Trump’s re-election. And many see Biden as a representative of a radical left agenda. This while progressive say Biden’s policies are not progressive enough. As the new administration prepares to enter the White House in January, the President Elect has called for unity. For OTP news in Washington. I’m Samantha Jill Anderson.

GOA ZHU
Thank you, Samantha and we’ll be right back after a quick break.

GOA ZHU
Thank you for sticking with us and welcome back to a special coverage and the aftermath of the 2020 presidential elections between Biden and Trump. One question remains in everyone’s minds. Why did so many Americans still vote for Trump? Although there is no one right answer, here are some explanations we found. According to Pew Research, the pre election polls in the US made clear that Biden would win the popular and electorial vote over Trump. Although that became true the election was much closer than poll suggested tightening races and several swing states, two tenths of a percentage points and 12 battleground states here in America, many polls over estimated democratic advantage by an average of about four percentage points. This means that state polling errors mirrored the 2016 presidential elections and were extremely similar to the past 12 presidential elections. James Hamblin, a reporter for the Atlantic suggests that Trump focuses on a winning vibe in order to garner more supporters. Trump markets himself as an alternative to the scientists and the doctors so more people would listen to him during the coronavirus pandemic. People’s need for support and stability are real. And apparently Biden failed to meet those needs in the eyes of many of the voters. It’s worth noting for the sake of clarity that while the economy has always been a driving factor, it was the Coronavirus that won the day in this new cycle. Some of the reasonings for Trump’s 2016 presidential win still carry through to this year’s election cycle. According to the Virginia Gazette. Many of Trump’s supporters agreed with Trump’s stance on strengthening border enforcement. They objected to the president and Justice Department interceding on the scales of justice when racial incidents were involved. And great concern a liberal judges and justices appointed to the federal judiciary and the Supreme Court, Oren Cass executive director of the American Compass wrote, election results determine who govern us they do not tell us who we are. America was an is the nation that elected George W. Bush in 2000 and made Barack Obama a two term president. The lesson to learn from this election is that whoever you supported, about half of your fellow citizens felt otherwise, neither vilifying nor costing to them will change any minds.

MORIAH MCREYNOLDS
It’s a scenario we see so often that it almost feels routine now. Whenever a vacancy opens up on the Supreme Court, seething political battles are waged over the nominee. These battles seem to have become increasingly heated over the last five years or so culminating into some of the most bitter Supreme Court confirmation hearings in recent memory with justice Cavanaugh in 2018. And now justice Barrett and 2020. There are several factors that have led to the combative nature of these confirmation hearings. legal scholars argue about which one is the true catalyst Elizabeth Beske, a law professor at American University argues that while the bitterness is nothing new, Mitch McConnell’s decision to block President Barack Obama’s nominee Merrick Garland in 2016, it’s one of the biggest factors

ELIZABETH BESKE
which would have been better served to have you know, famous That they were dotting their eyes and crossing their T’s and then voting him down. The novelty is just not even pretending that he wasn’t in a Machiavellian way trying to cheat.

MORIAH MCREYNOLDS
The move was unprecedented. Paul Schiff Berman, a law professor at George Washington University, and former clerk to Justice Ginsburg warns that the consequences of this decision could be dire.

PAUL SCHIFF BERMAN
Mitch McConnell’s approach creates the possibility that we will never again have a judge who could ever be appointed by a president from one party and confirmed by a senate controlled by the other party. Which means in theory, if we never have the same party controlling the presidency and the Senate, we could slowly have no judges left.

MORIAH MCREYNOLDS
But McConnell is not the only factor to consider here. The politicization of Supreme Court nominations began well before his rise to power. Many argue that the nomination and ultimate rejection of Robert Bork in 1987 was the true catalyst as well as the rise of the Federalist Society that followed shortly after.

PAUL SCHIFF BERMAN
Conservatives saw that as a wake up call, the purpose of the Federalist Society was to make sure those kinds of nominations never happened. Again, they’ve looked for warriors in a political war. And they’ve really viewed the courts as an arm of political partisanship.

MORIAH MCREYNOLDS
Although Beske believes all this began before Bork was even nominated.

ELIZABETH BESKE
I would peel it back to Nixon putting the courts on public radar screen as an overtly political campaign. that then becomes by the time of Bork, you have single issue voters, the GOP makes a huge push to champion the single issue that focuses public attention on a soundbite that everybody can understand.

PAUL SCHIFF BERMAN
One question will be over time, if there’s a big disjuncture between where the Supreme Court is and where the American popular consensus is, we may see the Supreme Court lose a certain amount of institutional legitimacy. Because after all, the judiciary only works to the extent that people are willing to follow what they say.

GOA ZHU
We are back. But before we go, our executive producer Ivy Lyons had a few notes to add to an already long running less, but the pandemic race and this election cycle, they are also an officer with Georgetown Society of Professional Journalists, and continue to work with our small but closed staff. Ivy?

IVY LYONS
Thank you so much for that Goa. Now I am in Virginia, the entirety of our staff has been spurred out not just across the United States, but in parts of Canada and Greece and so many other places. And I wanted to thank them on this episode, but also to talk about the things that we’ve been discussing this whole year. As students and journalists as people who are going through our education and making sense of the world around us, we have been struggling to understand exactly what it is that makes up news. More specifically, we’ve been trying to get to the bottom of a few ethical dilemmas. How are journalists presenting the news? When do you know you can trust things? We’ve seen a lot of great student journalism that’s been covered on our project and outside of our project and news outlets in the United States and around the world. We’ve had the benefit of international correspondence, and student journalists, students, former student leadership and so many other people who impact the way that we report and what we do for DC TV for our own personal branding and in collaboration with other sponsors. For our educational experience, especially for those of us who don’t have access to a particular type of broadcasting education, this became an outlet in the DC area. For us, it became a way to actually challenge substantial understandings of national news. And we’re proud of it. And it’s for that reason, and for so many other reasons that we stopped. We went to produce videos that would go on DC TV, go out online, put together our branding, and we had to stop. The Coronavirus took over the way that student media was covering the world that they lived in. Because students were at home. You are not in the comfort of a studio on even Georgetown’s campus. Where I call home, you aren’t in the comfort of a student studio on our main campus or satellite campus, you aren’t getting these videos from any sort of new digital experience. Instead, you’re receiving videos, like many of those who are on dctv, from phone cameras, from late night hours and conversations over FaceTime. And that is where the most impactful things have happened. Here is Matthew Bernico, discussing podcasting as a new form of media for journalists, let’s take a look

MATTHEW BERNICO, PH.D.
-Creates some barriers to write like that. But something that you think about with podcasting, and journalism is the timeliness of it. You know, the thing about podcasts is that, you know, you they, they’re only it’s hard to do, like breaking news or something, or it’s hard to stay timely with your with your content. It’s only as timely as you can turn the podcast around, right. So you, if you if you have a podcast, and you’re doing sort of like current events or whatever, you better have a very good and dedicated team of people who are producing and editing that podcast, because your content will only end up being as good as, as you know, they can turn it around and how fast and getting kind of get it out. So like there’s that. But I think what you’re saying to some of it that I guess what I hear you saying and what I think is true is that podcasts are really cool for journalists to use, because it lets you put like more of your own voice and personality into the work and like you can connect with people via podcasting in ways that you cannot be the written word, right? Like, it’s one thing to read something like phenomenologically, you’re sitting there, you’re staring at a screen or a piece of paper or whatever, you’re reading it, it’s great. But like to hear someone’s voice, like enunciating and speaking it to you is something like very personal. It’s such a weird thing like this is I guess, like some more the philosophical background of like thinking about media, but like, you know, the act of putting headphones on and listen to a voice in your ears, like, I mean, think about, it’s like, you know, someone’s like whispering whatever into your ears, it’s like a very, it’s a very personal moment, actually. So there’s like this moment, this way that that podcasting is embodied in a way that journalism, or that written journalism is not and then can make these connections that you couldn’t make otherwise. So I think there’s that, you know, so so people can make these deeper connections with journalists themselves. That’s one thing. The other thing too is that audiences can make deeper connections with the sources, like the people that you’re actually that you’re actually making the media about. So like, audio journalism, like gives you the affordance of presence, I guess, is what I’m trying to say embodiment, presence, whatever you want to say. So you know, you’re writing an article, for example, for you know, whatever publication, that’s cool. And you know, you’ll grab a pull quote from somebody, and you’ll put it in there, and it’ll be powerful or whatever. But in audio, it’s awesome. Because if you’re doing like produce documentary style, audio work, or even if you’re just interviewing somebody, right, you have that person’s voice there. And the the truth of it, I think, is stronger when you hear someone say it rather than just, you know, you saying or hearing and writing. So I think that there’s a whole rhetoric and persuasiveness to podcasting, that I think is kind of overlooked by a lot of people in media, but it’s powerful. I mean, you hear a really well produced piece of audio recording, you know, you hear someone’s voice saying something you know about their struggle or what they’re going through or the story, it really connects with you. And I think that’s important.

IVY LYONS
And coordination is part of this project. And as part of a larger project, we got the chance to utilize some information that was gained through the Society of Professional Journalists chapter at Georgetown University. The second consideration that we made were ethical considerations, and we talked with ethics professors. We talked with Georgetown University’s own, the Lisa Smith Barrow, and Carol Feldman, who is the current Faculty Director over at Georgetown University and also teaches ethics for the Georgetown master’s program. We wanted to ask them both a similar question one, what should journalists be doing as far as price is concerned as far as the ethical considerations that need to be made are concerned? And two? What are we doing moving forward? What who are journalists? And do we know how to define a journalist?

DELECE SMITH-BARROW
part personal and partly determined by our peers? I consider myself a journalist but also my peers consider me a journalist. I think it’s a two way street. Because there I think you can be a writer, but not be a journalist. You know, you can be a photographer but not be a photojournalist. But I think people who are following the core tenets of journalism in terms of being accurate, being fair being balanced. I’m being honest, leaving your opinion out of it. I think those are what makes you a journalist. And I think you almost in some ways, you have to kind of show you can do that. You can’t just say, you know, I’m a journalist, you have to show it. And I think that’s where your peers kind of come in. And they can say, Oh, yeah, you’re doing it right. Or they might say, well, this isn’t, this doesn’t quite seem to be journalist journalism, this seems a little bit more subjective or something else. I don’t know if there needs to be a higher barrier to entry actually think it’s pretty hard to get into the industry,

CAROLE FELDMAN
I think, you know, as the least said, you know, you know, for someone to be a journalist, they need to, you know, abide by a set of rules and standards. Anyone can do tweet out, information can tweet out a statement. But how do you know that that statement is true? So with a journalist, if you have, you know, an reputation and an organized organization behind you, it helps to establish your credibility that you can that you can trust the information that that person is providing.

IVY LYONS
Now, that’s a lot too lay on you. This is our last recording for the year. We recorded this episode in 2020 as part of a special and we wanted to record a ton of specials while we were in the heat of the Coronavirus, because this matters, all of these conversations matter. All of these conversations will have long term impact on how we view the world that we live in. We wanted to make sure that we recorded it because journalism tends to be a first draft of history. And because of that tendency, we also invite you to continue talking with us. I am beyond grateful that my friends gave me this platform and that I get to share it with them. And we look forward to continuing to give student journalism a voice in the DC area and around the world. But as for right now, my name is Ivy Lyons and Goa, thank you. Thank you for that.

GOA ZHU
Thank you so much for joining us today. Feel free to look online for our supporting documents. And of course to join this riveting conversation. I’m Goa Zhu and this has been another OTP Washington special report for air on DC TV.

DIGITAL EXCLUSIVE: OTP NEWS WASHINGTON – Covid and Student Journalism

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
Good day and thank you for joining us. I’m Samantha Jill Anderson and this is the inaugural episode of on the pulse Daily News

ANI KASPARIAN
And I’m on the cusp buried. Under normal circumstances, this show would have featured these amazing guests in a bright and lively enclosed space. a gathering of our staff and production crew would have been assembled to produce this brand new show. But that isn’t the case. By our tape air, experts expect that the United States will have surpassed 200,000 Coronavirus, deaths and millions more positive diagnosis of this is. With this in mind. Our first Special Edition will cover the issues of student journalism and education in the age of COVID-19. With us today is the former president of ISU’s transfer student organization, Nick Roberts. He also was the editor of ISU’s literary magazine entitled euphemism. Nick is also an author and poet who produced his first book Killdeer just under a year ago. Nick, welcome to the broadcast.

NICK ROBERTS
How’s it going?

ANI KASPARIAN
So Nick, could you tell us about your bias use campus, especially during the pandemic? How has your school been handling the Coronavirus?

NICK ROBERTS
Yeah. So, at Illinois State University I am currently actually taking a semester or two off from classes due to the fact that COVID is extremely bad at Illinois State University. So, a recent article published by Central Illinois proud indicated that about 1300 students have tested positive ISU as of 9/19. So the current standing is there’s about 930, negative cases 35 positive cases of the 3.6 positivity rate. But if you want to look at our total numbers, there’s 1414, total positive 6981, negative and 8395 total tested. So that just shows you just hold up statistic about exactly what’s going on. So yeah, that’s a little bit of what’s going on. So basically, at ISU about there’s 10% of the classes are in person. And they’re either in person or they’re hybrid courses. So that means that they meet like, maybe once a week and like a studio or something like that. And just other things as well. So, yeah, that’s just a little bit about some numbers and things going on, honestly right now.

ANI KASPARIAN
Thank you for that. So your university has actually caught national news attention when the boy is a Canadian youtuber group hosted a party on your college campus, bringing in a large number of people together, the number clearly violated the rules of the town that stated no more gatherings of more than 10 people at a time. Tell me what do you know exactly about this party? And were you there yourself?

NICK ROBERTS
Yeah. Making news like all I know, an article published by BuzzFeed, talked about it a little bit. It’s under “YouTube is Demonetizing popular frat channel Nelk boys.” And that’s the title of the article. So on September 19, the Nelk boys came to ICU, attracting crowds of like, I think it was 70 or 80, or maybe even 100 students at one of our largest and most expensive apartment complexes, and they’re actually monetized on YouTube. So what the what the university is doing now in order to sort of handle this situation is they are potentially suspending and finding every single student that can be identified or had any sort of connection to the event. And it was just – I remember watching the videos there was absolutely no. Don’t masks in sight, lots of alcohol, lots of drug use some potential drug use, possibly. And it was just just a very, very messy situation. And so the president of ISU is now potentially, like I said, finding and suspending students that were associated.

ANI KASPARIAN
Okay. You’ve been very outspoken against all the things that have happened at this party and your views have been read by many people. Can you take us through the process of what you had been preaching up to this point and up to the point where even the president of ISU Larry Deetz blocked you on social media is quite an achievement for a social media person. So, tell me, what do you think was the cause of this?

NICK ROBERTS
Um, so that’s our, that’s also a really funny story. So I was very, very vocal on my social media, specifically Facebook, where I was friends with the president of ISU Larry Dietz, on Facebook. So essentially, his Facebook page is run by a media team of students, I own my State University. And basically, two or three times every day, I would just share an article about how ISU has 600 700 now 1000 now 1300, now 1400 positive cases, and I would tag Larry Dietz in it, and I would tag Illinois State University in the US as well. And essentially, I didn’t hear anything from the the media intern or whoever was running his page. And I noticed one day when I tried to tag him and oppose his name wouldn’t like necessarily pop up, and I couldn’t click on it anymore. And so when I go to his page, and I look through my friends list, I am no longer there. He’s on Facebook, which is quite the achievement, I suppose, as a undergraduate. But I have been very, very vocal to my fellow students, to my fellow ministers, family friends in the Bloomington normal zoning area, about staying at home, following these guidelines, following what needs to happen, and in order to just flatten the curve. So we have just been like, just like dealing with so much state right now. So we currently have are actually in 20, we had 21,039 students. So that is a pretty big number, compared to some other schools in the area, besides UI, of course. And so when we started seeing numbers in the hundreds, and in the hundreds, and hundreds and hundreds, and the 1000s things, just things got really scary in Central Illinois. So I have been sort of practicing what I preach and staying home just going to my job and being very, very sorry, blonde, with friends that I see on social media that are going out that are bars that are just doing things like that. Yeah, that’s just a little bit about what’s going on with me.

ANI KASPARIAN
So practicing what you preach and staying safe doesn’t seem like something that I would block you for if I was president, what do you think was the the last straw for him to want to block you? What were some things that you said that maybe provoked him?

NICK ROBERTS
So um, if I look through my Facebook, I would share things on Facebook saying like, and it’s not only me, that has been putting pressure on him as a student, but a large majority of the faculty at Illinois State has been putting pressure on him as well. So I’m an English department, university where I’m studying creative writing, and our associate for the English, Brian rujak, wrote a open letter to President deeds and fellow administrators at ISU and said quote, you can’t just explain away 1300 cases by claiming that we test more than other schools. Because after people in the area, we’re putting a lot of pressure on deeds in order to get him to potentially shut up and just see what exactly what we’re saying or feeling. Deeds came out with a big public statement in his state of like, sort of like a state of the union address for a president and he said the truth is many state universities don’t test nearly as much as is you and don’t transparently report positive cases as ISU. Other universities test so often that their positivity rates skew lower through simple division. The ultimate fact is that Coronavirus impacts Illinois universities in a similar fashion. The more students more likely the incident of Coronavirus and create accounting and reporting does not alter that fact. So when he published his written statement and his video statement on his social media, I would simply share it and I would give him other facts about other schools.

ANI KASPARIAN
Samantha?

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
Thank you, Ani and Nick. Just north of the US border in Toronto, Canada, have attempted to transition into phase three Coronavirus restrictions, some have wondered what that means. And if Canada continues to have a plan on a COVID-19 response, our Correspondent Goa Zhu is in Toronto with more.

GOA ZHU
Hello everyone, Toronto’s currently in the stage three of reopening shops, restaurants, and other non essential businesses since its Coronavirus lockdown in March. We are currently in the shops at Davos Plaza situated in North York, where many people are taking advantage of the reopenings of shops and cafes. Now here in Toronto, stage three means reopening businesses, so it’s some safety measures be in place, as mandated by the Canadian government, cash and restaurants should be eliminated or minimized. As of August 5, masks are now required indoors and it’s becoming more common for customers to have their temperatures taken when they enter restaurants. Because medic chains such as Sephora and beauty boutique by shoppers, it’s not allowing any customers to try on makeup. Instead they take a cotton swab and swipe it onto a white piece of paper to show people that different shapes and makeup.

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
That was Goa Zhu live in Toronto, Ontario just a few hours north of Washington DC and she is here with us now. So Goa, what does the current COVID-19 plan look like for that area has been formed yet?

GOA ZHU
Well as of now there is no plan yet to fully reopen and Toronto will remain in the stage three of reopening the public health officials are also preparing and stocking up on resources for the potential of a second wave of the virus this fall. For information updated every hour on the virus I recommend to check out the website toronto.ca

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
Has the area seen an increase or decrease since reopening.

GOA ZHU
There has been increasing COVID-19 cases in the province of Ontario. Today there has been a reported number of 407 new COVID cases, two thirds of which are under 40 years old, but no new deaths associated with the Coronavirus. Mayor Ford has said that he will reverse back a step of reopening if the cases continue to rise rapidly.

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
I don’t want to keep you too long. But I want to ask about students in the area. Do you have any information on how students are handling the covid 19 pandemic in that area of Canada any plans for schools that you are aware of?

GOA ZHU
So according to the health ministry, for the province of Ontario schools are requiring students to wear masks, wash their hands frequently and maintain physical distancing. They’re also strongly encouraging students to stay home when sick.

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
Thank you so much for your recording Goa. And thank you at home for continuing to stick with us. After the break our research stop for the on the pulse Washington crew you are watching On the Pulse Washington STUDENT NEWS.

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
Thank you for sticking with us and welcome back to the program. The past few weeks have been filled with political turmoil to the detriment of one party or another. But our producers ask themselves what student journalists around the country are saying instead, schools and their student media outlets around the country have been fighting to ensure that their stories are heard. Their Public Forum has continued to inform the localities they live in. In the case of the University of North Carolina for example, the daily Tar Heel took headlines with its claim of a cluster up in progress on its campus. It has since reported a roughly one to two positivity rate on its campus alone. Our reporters noted that the area while quiet for the most part, remain clustered with several noticeable gatherings of people wearing the powder blue synonymous with the university. DC area schools have brought stories to the forefront that match The timbre of UNC’s headline. Georgetown University students were dispossessed of personal items, according to the highest KC Farante. Likewise, George Washington University noted that a fraternity Delta Tau Delta had multiple members test positive for covid 19. According to Tiffany Garcia of The Hatchet. Across the country stories in North Texas daily, the Stanford daily, the Iowa State daily continue to cover a growing number of issues. The Daily Trojan, for example, cover the outstanding balance caused by a tuition hike at the University of Southern California. several universities have come under fire since then, with students wandering in opinion columns and in social media posts, why their institution has returned to an unsafe environment.Now those same students are finding their stories in the local coffee shop unread. As students without homes or financial stability look to continue thriving in their educational environment. Campus newsrooms have taken center stage. According to the Columbia Journalism Review, Serena Cho. “In recent months, as professional newsrooms have wrestled with their own historical failures, many college papers have explored ways to better support staffers of color and improve their coverage of the underprivileged. At times by transgressing the doctrines of old school journalism. Some have apologized to readers for historically misrepresenting communities of color and pledged solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement. Many have challenged the industry’s misguided belief in objectivity, arguing that it exalts the perspectives of white leaders and experts. A recent statement signed by 15 College editors urged professional journalists to reflect on their long standing bias against marginalized marginalized voices.” So with the onslaught of news and the persistent coverage of the year that has yet to have an awful week we asked the news Gods a single question, why is that? after a break, our panel will discuss.

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
We are back and our panel is joining us now. Nadine Bourne is on the post Washington’s podcast hosts. She’s a current graduate student at Georgetown University’s Master’s in journalism program, acting as a freelance journalist and radio and broadcasting. Elena Kefalogianni is also a master student in Georgetown University’s journalism program and the current secretary of Georgetown University’s the Society of Professional Journalists. She has worked with CNN, Greece and has published fiction writing and several stories with CNN. She is also an Onasis scholar. Let’s first discuss the coverage of issues like the Coronavirus and then we will jump to a dean for conversations on the broader marches and civil unrest in America. Elena and your experience our student journalists handling this properly, how have they been covering Coronavirus?

ELENA KEFALOGIANNI
So I would say that in the US, we have seen more and more students getting engaged with getting internships with media organizations and with finding or at least having some opportunities to travel or work with bigger media outside of their college campus newspaper. It is very different in Greece, if we were to compare it to the States, because students who are attending university for journalism, they’re only good chances to publish in their universities newspaper, most of the media don’t actually offer or have open places for internships. And that’s mostly a funding issue, but also the fact that it’s not so common for a university student to be able to work in one of the very few media outlets that we do have in my country. And as far as Coronavirus. In particular, Greece has been one of the countries who took it very seriously at the start with a very heavy lockdown where people couldn’t actually leave their houses unless they got government permission. So the media and most professional journalism have taken a really deep dive in covering that which has kind of left out students and opportunities for student journalism to have the same part that the professional journalists do have. And since our media are also more consolidated and in union with the government, I think that it allows for less coverage to go to people who are less experienced.

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
But when it comes to giving a voice to the young people, what, what avenues do they take, I mean, are general people reading college publications, how are young people getting their voice out?

ELENA KEFALOGIANNI
I would say that not a lot of people are actually reading college publications. I didn’t in fact know if it was going to be possible for me to get an internship until I ended up like contacting different media outlets myself, for example, some big ones in Greece is CNN, Greece that I worked for, as well as Kathy Mary knee, which is kind of like the biggest one, but it’s not as recognizable as CNN. And so that’s why I made my choice to go with CNN. But um, in terms of students, most of them go on social media to get reporting out. So Instagram is very big people have their own blogs. But there’s definitely not enough student journalism on bigger outlets. And in fact, I would say that you would have to have some prior experience or know some people in order to be able to get your work published in one of those big media organizations. Just because, like, again, it we’re very consolidated. And there’s a lot of union within the media, which is good. So there’s not enough misinformation. But it also falls in the hands of the few more experienced journalists.

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
Definitely a tough situation all around. Nadine, bringing it back stateside, we know what’s been going on at universities across the country with these Coronavirus cases on how do you feel the student journalists have been covering what’s going on in their campuses in turn in terms of cases being reported or not being reported? students being welcomed back to campus and then told they need to leave? Again? How do you feel about the coverage?

NADINE BOURNE
The coverage has definitely been mixed throughout last month and a half. I know a lot of schools did start opening back up in late August. It’s it’s hard. And it’s difficult when you have a virus that’s so unpredictable. And you don’t know who’s the carrier and who’s not a carrier for this. So I think in some ways, student journalists and college papers are trying to do the best that they can with updating their campuses very well. I think one thing about a lot of people, or maybe a lot of faculty members on colleges don’t really include our on campus students versus off campus students and how those off campus living students can wildly affect the cases on campus as well. And that’s something you know, nobody really talks about. And we need to be more concerned about students who are off campus because we’re their policies, you know, can they go and visit other friends? Can they go on campus and to visit other friends and buildings I know, at Boston University, if you live in one building, and your friend lives in another dorm building, your friend can come and visit you. That’s strictly forbidden, no guest policies. So I really wonder how off campus policies differ from that, or if they don’t differ at all, and our student journalists on on college campuses, putting those numbers into the overall numbers as well.

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
I’m glad that you mentioned that I actually remember reading from the editorial board of the Daily Tar Heel, that they were basically saying, you know, the university should have known that when students would come back, they would be reckless, they would be not necessarily following the rules and that it was basically the university’s fault for not putting more rules in place or for basically not telling students to stay home. So how do you feel about that? Do you think it is solely the university’s fault? Or do you think students should have some of the liability?

NADINE BOURNE
No, definitely students do have a liability for that, you know, universities put restrictions for the safety of the students. And I think up to that point, that is the university’s responsibility. Now, after that, it’s up to the students on whether or not they want to follow it. So if students don’t want to follow the restrictions, and the rules are set in place for specifically, their safety, you might be seen, you know, in an increase in cases and so students definitely have to take on that responsibility of what am I doing to ensure my safety? What am I doing to ensure the safety of the people that are also surrounding me? So if you have roommates, if you have a significant other that’s on campus as well? Are you really going to take that risk, to go to a party to go out and hang out with people you know, at a local bar if bars are open in that area, just for the sake of hanging out knowing that there’s a whole pandemic here knowing that 1000s hundreds of 1000s of people have been dying already from the spiral. How much of a risk is a student willing to take for that? You know,

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
Nadine, thank you so much for taking the time to join me. Elena will stick around for an interview with our international producer and host on esperion after a short break, don’t want to miss.

ANI KASPARIAN
And now a special report, a new virus causes new approaches around the world, different countries have handled this pandemic differently. One of those countries is Greece. In April, the New York Times called Greece a country that had defied the odds in the pandemic, due to its relatively low numbers, region. Today, a special guest joins us to discuss her experience returning to her home country. And then I kept it Oh, yummy. Thank you so much for joining us once again today.

ELENA KEFALOGIANNI
Thank you for having me.

ANI KASPARIAN
So I didn’t know you as an international student at Georgetown University here in the USA saw the pandemic hit, you decided to go back to your home country, Greece, I saw you share some of your experience on your Instagram stories, which caught a lot of attention. Can you take us through what happened when you arrived in Greece to finally get into your house?

ELENA KEFALOGIANNI
Greece was on a very strict walk down. You couldn’t even leave your house unless you texted the government the purpose for leaving your house. And there were very specific rules. So once the airport’s open, opened up again, on May 18. Everybody who got back was getting a test at the airport.

ANI KASPARIAN
Now what I want to ask you is when you said that you were coming off the plane, and they force tested all the citizens, you felt like it was a breach of your privacy. Now a lot of Americans here think that wearing a mask is like a breach of their freedom. If you were for any country, how would you something like this, but more.

ELENA KEFALOGIANNI
So the mask being a breach of privacy, I don’t understand that argument at all. And being forced tested. Again, I didn’t think that was a breach of privacy. I thought the fact that there was a camera man filming that process was a breach of privacy. Because again, I really do support. And I know Greece is a smaller country. So it doesn’t get as many visitors as the United States. So being having testing, everybody is great, because when they stopped doing that, and we opened up for the tourists, that’s when the case spiked back up on the islands. So you know, the testing was fine, but I just didn’t understand why that part had to be filmed. And speaking of journalism, since that’s what we’re doing. Now. I do know that in public places you are allowed to film. But this was an area where we were getting tested. And I don’t have knowledge of what is allowed or not. But I was certainly something that felt like a breach of privacy. When it comes to masks. I mean, masks were mandatory in Greece, and people never complained about it. Obviously, yes, it’s not like you’re breathing the same way with or without a mask. But we’re in a pandemic. And so with all respect to the people in the United States that feel like this is a breach of their privacy. But you know if if they feel that they have the option to actually stay home and not go outside and infect other people

ANI KASPARIAN
Thank you so much for your time. [INAUDIBLE]

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
Thank you for having me. And thank you so much for joining us for our first episode of on the pulse Washington. You can join the conversation with our crew online at OTP. Washington on socials. For now, I’m Samantha Jill Anderson –

ANI KASPARIAN
and I’m Ana Kasparian. Please be safe, wash your hands and wear a mask. We’ll see you very soon on on the pulse News, Washington.

CANADA’S RESPONSE TO COVID-19

TORONTO-Last Friday, Mayor Ford has announced that Toronto will be back to Stage 2 of re-opening due to the recent surge in COVID-19 cases. According to CP24, Toronto, Ottawa, and Peel Region will close down gyms, movie theatres, and all in-room dining for 28 days. This comes just before the Canadian Thanksgiving weekend.

As of the news segment displayed above, it describes the Stage 3 of re-opening within the North York region in Toronto during the summer months of 2020. 

In the Don Mills Plaza situated in North York, many non-essential businesses are slowly re-opening but with some restrictions be in place.

“As mandated by the Canadian government, cash in restaurants should be eliminated or minimized, masks are now required indoors as of Aug 5th, and it’s becoming more common for customers to have their temperature taken when they enter restaurants.”

“Cosmetic chains, such as Sephora and Beauty Boutique by Shoppers, is not allowing any customers to try on make-up. Instead, they take a cotton swab and swipe it on a white piece of paper for people to see the different shades in make-up.”

Source:

https://www.cp24.com/news/toronto-peel-and-ottawa-moved-into-modified-stage-2-as-ford-admits-that-all-trends-are-going-in-the-wrong-direction-1.5139205

https://www.toronto.ca/home/covid-19/https://www.toronto.ca/home/covid-19/covid-19-reopening-recovery-rebuild/covid-19-city-initiatives-related-to-reopening-recovery-rebuild/

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ontario-covid-september-18-update-1.5729286https://torontostoreys.com/toronto-coronavirus-

map/https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2020/09/19/coronavirus-updates-covid-19-canada-ontario-toronto-gta-sept-19-2020.html

PANEL: Classes and Covid-19

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
We are back and our panel is joining us now. Nadine Bourne is on the post Washington’s podcast hosts. She’s a current graduate student at Georgetown University’s Master’s in journalism program, acting as a freelance journalist and radio and broadcasting. Elena Kefalogianni is also a master student in Georgetown University’s journalism program and the current secretary of Georgetown University’s the Society of Professional Journalists. She has worked with CNN, Greece and has published fiction writing and several stories with CNN. She is also an Onasis scholar. Let’s first discuss the coverage of issues like the Coronavirus and then we will jump to a dean for conversations on the broader marches and civil unrest in America. Elena and your experience our student journalists handling this properly, how have they been covering Coronavirus?

ELENA KEFALOGIANNI
So I would say that in the US, we have seen more and more students getting engaged with getting internships with media organizations and with finding or at least having some opportunities to travel or work with bigger media outside of their college campus newspaper. It is very different in Greece, if we were to compare it to the States, because students who are attending university for journalism, they’re only good chances to publish in their universities newspaper, most of the media don’t actually offer or have open places for internships. And that’s mostly a funding issue, but also the fact that it’s not so common for a university student to be able to work in one of the very few media outlets that we do have in my country. And as far as Coronavirus. In particular, Greece has been one of the countries who took it very seriously at the start with a very heavy lockdown where people couldn’t actually leave their houses unless they got government permission. So the media and most professional journalism have taken a really deep dive in covering that which has kind of left out students and opportunities for student journalism to have the same part that the professional journalists do have. And since our media are also more consolidated and in union with the government, I think that it allows for less coverage to go to people who are less experienced.

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
But when it comes to giving a voice to the young people, what, what avenues do they take, I mean, are general people reading college publications, how are young people getting their voice out?

ELENA KEFALOGIANNI
I would say that not a lot of people are actually reading college publications. I didn’t in fact know if it was going to be possible for me to get an internship until I ended up like contacting different media outlets myself, for example, some big ones in Greece is CNN, Greece that I worked for, as well as Kathy Mary knee, which is kind of like the biggest one, but it’s not as recognizable as CNN. And so that’s why I made my choice to go with CNN. But um, in terms of students, most of them go on social media to get reporting out. So Instagram is very big people have their own blogs. But there’s definitely not enough student journalism on bigger outlets. And in fact, I would say that you would have to have some prior experience or know some people in order to be able to get your work published in one of those big media organizations. Just because, like, again, it we’re very consolidated. And there’s a lot of union within the media, which is good. So there’s not enough misinformation. But it also falls in the hands of the few more experienced journalists.

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
Definitely a tough situation all around. Nadine, bringing it back stateside, we know what’s been going on at universities across the country with these Coronavirus cases on how do you feel the student journalists have been covering what’s going on in their campuses in turn in terms of cases being reported or not being reported? students being welcomed back to campus and then told they need to leave? Again? How do you feel about the coverage?

NADINE BOURNE
The coverage has definitely been mixed throughout last month and a half. I know a lot of schools did start opening back up in late August. It’s it’s hard. And it’s difficult when you have a virus that’s so unpredictable. And you don’t know who’s the carrier and who’s not a carrier for this. So I think in some ways, student journalists and college papers are trying to do the best that they can with updating their campuses very well. I think one thing about a lot of people, or maybe a lot of faculty members on colleges don’t really include our on campus students versus off campus students and how those off campus living students can wildly affect the cases on campus as well. And that’s something you know, nobody really talks about. And we need to be more concerned about students who are off campus because we’re their policies, you know, can they go and visit other friends? Can they go on campus and to visit other friends and buildings I know, at Boston University, if you live in one building, and your friend lives in another dorm building, your friend can come and visit you. That’s strictly forbidden, no guest policies. So I really wonder how off campus policies differ from that, or if they don’t differ at all, and our student journalists on on college campuses, putting those numbers into the overall numbers as well.

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
I’m glad that you mentioned that I actually remember reading from the editorial board of the Daily Tar Heel, that they were basically saying, you know, the university should have known that when students would come back, they would be reckless, they would be not necessarily following the rules and that it was basically the university’s fault for not putting more rules in place or for basically not telling students to stay home. So how do you feel about that? Do you think it is solely the university’s fault? Or do you think students should have some of the liability?

NADINE BOURNE
No, definitely students do have a liability for that, you know, universities put restrictions for the safety of the students. And I think up to that point, that is the university’s responsibility. Now, after that, it’s up to the students on whether or not they want to follow it. So if students don’t want to follow the restrictions, and the rules are set in place for specifically, their safety, you might be seen, you know, in an increase in cases and so students definitely have to take on that responsibility of what am I doing to ensure my safety? What am I doing to ensure the safety of the people that are also surrounding me? So if you have roommates, if you have a significant other that’s on campus as well? Are you really going to take that risk, to go to a party to go out and hang out with people you know, at a local bar if bars are open in that area, just for the sake of hanging out knowing that there’s a whole pandemic here knowing that 1000s hundreds of 1000s of people have been dying already from the spiral. How much of a risk is a student willing to take for that? You know,

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
Nadine, thank you so much for taking the time to join me. Elena will stick around for an interview with our international producer and host on esperion after a short break, don’t want to miss.

RESEARCH STOP: Who’s reading student news?

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
Thank you for sticking with us and welcome back to the program. The past few weeks have been filled with political turmoil to the detriment of one party or another. But our producers ask themselves what student journalists around the country are saying instead, schools and their student media outlets around the country have been fighting to ensure that their stories are heard. Their Public Forum has continued to inform the localities they live in. In the case of the University of North Carolina for example, the daily Tar Heel took headlines with its claim of a cluster up in progress on its campus. It has since reported a roughly one to two positivity rate on its campus alone. Our reporters noted that the area while quiet for the most part, remain clustered with several noticeable gatherings of people wearing the powder blue synonymous with the university. DC area schools have brought stories to the forefront that match The timbre of UNC’s headline. Georgetown University students were dispossessed of personal items, according to the highest KC Farante. Likewise, George Washington University noted that a fraternity Delta Tau Delta had multiple members test positive for covid 19. According to Tiffany Garcia of The Hatchet. Across the country stories in North Texas daily, the Stanford daily, the Iowa State daily continue to cover a growing number of issues. The Daily Trojan, for example, cover the outstanding balance caused by a tuition hike at the University of Southern California. several universities have come under fire since then, with students wandering in opinion columns and in social media posts, why their institution has returned to an unsafe environment.Now those same students are finding their stories in the local coffee shop unread. As students without homes or financial stability look to continue thriving in their educational environment. Campus newsrooms have taken center stage. According to the Columbia Journalism Review, Serena Cho. “In recent months, as professional newsrooms have wrestled with their own historical failures, many college papers have explored ways to better support staffers of color and improve their coverage of the underprivileged. At times by transgressing the doctrines of old school journalism. Some have apologized to readers for historically misrepresenting communities of color and pledged solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement. Many have challenged the industry’s misguided belief in objectivity, arguing that it exalts the perspectives of white leaders and experts. A recent statement signed by 15 College editors urged professional journalists to reflect on their long standing bias against marginalized marginalized voices.” So with the onslaught of news and the persistent coverage of the year that has yet to have an awful week we asked the news Gods a single question, why is that? after a break, our panel will discuss.

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH KILLDEER MEDIA’S NICK ROBERTS

EDITOR’S NOTE: The images included in this story were of the University of Illinois and campuses in Illinois. This story did not include photography of the Illinois State University campus.

SAMANTHA JILL ANDERSON
Good day and thank you for joining us. I’m Samantha Jill Anderson and this is the inaugural episode of on the pulse Daily News

ANI KASPARIAN
And I’m on the cusp buried. Under normal circumstances, this show would have featured these amazing guests in a bright and lively enclosed space. a gathering of our staff and production crew would have been assembled to produce this brand new show. But that isn’t the case. By our tape air, experts expect that the United States will have surpassed 200,000 Coronavirus, deaths and millions more positive diagnosis of this is. With this in mind. Our first Special Edition will cover the issues of student journalism and education in the age of COVID-19. With us today is the former president of ISU’s transfer student organization, Nick Roberts. He also was the editor of ISU’s literary magazine entitled euphemism. Nick is also an author and poet who produced his first book Killdeer just under a year ago. Nick, welcome to the broadcast.

NICK ROBERTS
How’s it going?

ANI KASPARIAN
So Nick, could you tell us about your bias use campus, especially during the pandemic? How has your school been handling the Coronavirus?

NICK ROBERTS
Yeah. So, at Illinois State University I am currently actually taking a semester or two off from classes due to the fact that COVID is extremely bad at Illinois State University. So, a recent article published by Central Illinois proud indicated that about 1300 students have tested positive ISU as of 9/19. So the current standing is there’s about 930, negative cases 35 positive cases of the 3.6 positivity rate. But if you want to look at our total numbers, there’s 1414, total positive 6981, negative and 8395 total tested. So that just shows you just hold up statistic about exactly what’s going on. So yeah, that’s a little bit of what’s going on. So basically, at ISU about there’s 10% of the classes are in person. And they’re either in person or they’re hybrid courses. So that means that they meet like, maybe once a week and like a studio or something like that. And just other things as well. So, yeah, that’s just a little bit about some numbers and things going on, honestly right now.

ANI KASPARIAN
Thank you for that. So your university has actually caught national news attention when the boy is a Canadian youtuber group hosted a party on your college campus, bringing in a large number of people together, the number clearly violated the rules of the town that stated no more gatherings of more than 10 people at a time. Tell me what do you know exactly about this party? And were you there yourself?

NICK ROBERTS
Yeah. Making news like all I know, an article published by BuzzFeed, talked about it a little bit. It’s under “YouTube is Demonetizing popular frat channel Nelk boys.” And that’s the title of the article. So on September 19, the Nelk boys came to ICU, attracting crowds of like, I think it was 70 or 80, or maybe even 100 students at one of our largest and most expensive apartment complexes, and they’re actually monetized on YouTube. So what the what the university is doing now in order to sort of handle this situation is they are potentially suspending and finding every single student that can be identified or had any sort of connection to the event. And it was just – I remember watching the videos there was absolutely no. Don’t masks in sight, lots of alcohol, lots of drug use some potential drug use, possibly. And it was just just a very, very messy situation. And so the president of ISU is now potentially, like I said, finding and suspending students that were associated.

ANI KASPARIAN
Okay. You’ve been very outspoken against all the things that have happened at this party and your views have been read by many people. Can you take us through the process of what you had been preaching up to this point and up to the point where even the president of ISU Larry Deetz blocked you on social media is quite an achievement for a social media person. So, tell me, what do you think was the cause of this?

NICK ROBERTS
Um, so that’s our, that’s also a really funny story. So I was very, very vocal on my social media, specifically Facebook, where I was friends with the president of ISU Larry Dietz, on Facebook. So essentially, his Facebook page is run by a media team of students, I own my State University. And basically, two or three times every day, I would just share an article about how ISU has 600 700 now 1000 now 1300, now 1400 positive cases, and I would tag Larry Dietz in it, and I would tag Illinois State University in the US as well. And essentially, I didn’t hear anything from the the media intern or whoever was running his page. And I noticed one day when I tried to tag him and oppose his name wouldn’t like necessarily pop up, and I couldn’t click on it anymore. And so when I go to his page, and I look through my friends list, I am no longer there. He’s on Facebook, which is quite the achievement, I suppose, as a undergraduate. But I have been very, very vocal to my fellow students, to my fellow ministers, family friends in the Bloomington normal zoning area, about staying at home, following these guidelines, following what needs to happen, and in order to just flatten the curve. So we have just been like, just like dealing with so much state right now. So we currently have are actually in 20, we had 21,039 students. So that is a pretty big number, compared to some other schools in the area, besides UI, of course. And so when we started seeing numbers in the hundreds, and in the hundreds, and hundreds and hundreds, and the 1000s things, just things got really scary in Central Illinois. So I have been sort of practicing what I preach and staying home just going to my job and being very, very sorry, blonde, with friends that I see on social media that are going out that are bars that are just doing things like that. Yeah, that’s just a little bit about what’s going on with me.

ANI KASPARIAN
So practicing what you preach and staying safe doesn’t seem like something that I would block you for if I was president, what do you think was the the last straw for him to want to block you? What were some things that you said that maybe provoked him?

NICK ROBERTS
So um, if I look through my Facebook, I would share things on Facebook saying like, and it’s not only me, that has been putting pressure on him as a student, but a large majority of the faculty at Illinois State has been putting pressure on him as well. So I’m an English department, university where I’m studying creative writing, and our associate for the English, Brian rujak, wrote a open letter to President deeds and fellow administrators at ISU and said quote, you can’t just explain away 1300 cases by claiming that we test more than other schools. Because after people in the area, we’re putting a lot of pressure on deeds in order to get him to potentially shut up and just see what exactly what we’re saying or feeling. Deeds came out with a big public statement in his state of like, sort of like a state of the union address for a president and he said the truth is many state universities don’t test nearly as much as is you and don’t transparently report positive cases as ISU. Other universities test so often that their positivity rates skew lower through simple division. The ultimate fact is that Coronavirus impacts Illinois universities in a similar fashion. The more students more likely the incident of Coronavirus and create accounting and reporting does not alter that fact. So when he published his written statement and his video statement on his social media, I would simply share it and I would give him other facts about other schools.

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